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Any theories on how the Mayor of the Shire was elected? How was the election held? All we know is that the Mayor was elected every seven years on Midsummer's Day.

Would it be a vote by the family heads? All the family heads, or just the gentry? There have to be thousands, if not tens of thousands, of families in the Shire - how would that be organized if all the family heads were required to be in attendance? What about families like the Gamgees, who have changed their names upteen billion times? Does changing the family name create another separate family patronage, or will they still be represented by the original family head? (Perhaps this would change once the new family name has been well-established for a couple of generations.) If only the gentry voted, they would then be responsible for voting not only for their own family, but all the families that work for them and/or the towns they represent. This would dramatically decrease the problem with the numbers, but seems too political for hobbits.
Current Mood:
thoughtful thoughtful
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The image that Tolkien gives us of Minas Tirith during the war, and in the years just prior to it, is a city that has fallen largely into desolation. Abandoned houses, more than half the citizens gone, empty streets.

Once Pippin and Gandalf reach the Citadel, such descriptions are not carried over, from what I could see during a quick read through. The White Tree is dead of course, but the lawn about it is well tended. It can be assumed the White Tower is also kept in good repair, as it is highly used. The room of the house that Gandalf and Pippin stay in is described as mostly bare, besides a table, some chairs and the beds.

Looking over the map of Minas Tirith in the Atlas of Middle-earth, there is the White Tree, the White Tower and the King's House. In a diagram of the Citadel itself, there are many more buildings shown, including the house that Pippin and Gandalf stayed in as well as the great feast hall, but we are told that there are many more buildings than those depicted there. The text of LOTR even indicates streets with closely built buildings, much as the crowded but empty streets in the city below.

So my questions: What is the state of the King's House after nearly 1000 years of disuse? Would it have been kept up over all those years, especially the last ten years or so when things got really hot and heavy and there were so few people on hand to spare for the caring of it? Or was it used? Would the Ruling Stewards have stayed there, or did they have their own dwellings?

Also of interest, though not as pressing: Who else would be dwelling on the Citadel? The King's advisors and other politicals, as well as honored guests and visiting ambassadors, no doubt, and there would be, I assume, lodging for the Guards of the Tower. Who would live within the King's House, aside from his family, personal guests and hired hands? Has anyone ever visualized what the King's House would look like as far as a layout? If Aragorn would not have been able to move into the house directly, where would he have stayed? We know he did not live w/ the rest of the Fellowship, who lived in a house in the City, which I assume to mean somewhere on the six levels below the Citadel.
Current Mood:
curious curious
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What would hobbits call cookies? Biscuits?

Yule cookies? Yule biscuits? Yule cakes?

Thank you!

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We know that Bilbo carried the Ring for decades before it really seemed to get Its hooks into him at the end.

Of course, there is the part about his untruths regarding how he acquired It, but other than that It seemed to have remarkably little effect on him.

Now, Gandalf said a lot of that had to do with his mercy to Gollum, and I'm sure it did: but he did something remarkable in giving It voluntarily to Frodo.

I'm wondering... We know that hobbits are generous by nature, giving gifts to others on their own birthdays, for example. But Bilbo seemed to be especially generous, even for a hobbit--he spent lavishly on *new* gifts, for example, where others would have only given mathoms. And then there was his Adventure, in which he was able to resist the lure of Dragon-gold, and to give up the Arkenstone in order to bring peace between the Elves, Men and Dwarves.

How much, do you suppose, did this experience affect Bilbo, in helping him to resist the Ring?
Current Mood:
curious curious
Current Music:
The DH, channel surfing
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Got a question: when the hobbits are sleeping in the house of Tom Bombadil, Frodo and Merry and Pippin dream. Frodo has a prescient dream of Gandalf being rescued from the tower at Isengard. Pippin has a dream based on the day's experiences in which the house is not a house, but Old Man Willow, and he is again trapped inside. Merry has a dream of dark water, pooling and rising around and inside the house and he thinks he will drown.

Later, in Bree, when Nob describes finding Merry after his encounter with the Black Rider, he says, "He seemed to be asleep. 'I thought I had fallen into deep water,' he says to me, when I shook him...."

What is this water reference with regard to Merry? Does anybody have any idea where it comes from or what it's all about?

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Who wrote the genealogies and commentaries? Was it Frodo? Bilbo? Sam? In the Thain's Book on Tuckborough.net, it mentions that "... Undertowers a fifth volume of genealogies and other notes and commentary was compiled. These were preserved in the library of Undertowers for future generations along with other historical books and records." Could it possibly have been Elanor who wrote them or perhaps at least some of them?
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I have been considering the nicknames given to the Masters of Buckland (Brandybuck of Buckland Famiily Tree), and I am wondering about Saradoc's: Scattergold.'

Saradoc's father, the reknowned Rorimac, was called 'Goldfather.' I'm assuming this means he either had a talent for making money or that he horded it. Certainly it seems to imply wealth in any case.

So if Saradoc was tagged 'Scattergold,' does that mean he was wasteful in spending it or benevolent in bestowing it on those less fortunate?

What do you think?

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I would like to include in a story some details of Stoorish River-life and how it would it have differed from that of Shire-dwellers. The Gladden Fields sound like nothing but marshes and irises and I don't know how the inhabitants would compensate. Can anyone tell me about River-folk in our world?
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If I wanted to name a man "man of books" would it be Perfadan? Perf is books (parf is singular) and adan being man.

Thanks!

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How long did Elanor remain a maid of honour to Arwen? I see that she became one in 1436 SR but I'm not seeing an end date. Has anyone seen one? Thanks!
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