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The Atlas of Middle-Earth (Karen Wynn Fonstad) has on page 121 a view of the Brandywine River and the ferry at Brandy Hall. According to text elsewhere in the book, and to the mileage key on this page, the width of the river is 1/2 mile. There's a good visual of what that would look like on this site about the Upper Mississippi: http://members.aol.com/americacruising/mississippi-upper.html.

It appears the Brandywine is a pretty substantial river, and from every map I've been able to locate it flows pretty consistently in that 1/2 mile channel all the way to the Sea.

So here's my question: how does Sarn Ford happen? What does that look like, do you think, and how do things thin out enough that people can wade or ride horse- or ponyback through it? Might there be a ferry? It's often described as "stony"--where is all that water going?

I grew up in a place that had an "underground river"--one that had both an upper and lower channel. Is this maybe what's happening at Sarn Ford?

I need to get this figured out pretty soon! I'm open to suggestions and/or canon I may have missed. Help!
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The recent drabble I did for the drabble remix has got me thinking about Gandalf and Narya...Read more...Collapse )
Current Music:
the air conditioner
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I wanted to do this as a poll, but I don't have a plus or paid account. Sorry folks.

I'm trying to figure out what the people of Khand would call themselves. Unfortunately, we know almost nothing about them from Tolkien. "Southrons" are the people of Harad, aka the Haradrim. "Easterlings" is just a grouping of all people from the East and is not specific to any individual people or country.

There are the Variags, as mentioned in ROTK, but they seem to be a sub-culture of Khand. It's said they don't like sunlight, so I have to think that they are mixed with orc-blood and probably live much closer to Mordor, where it would be darker.

Here are the options my flist and I have come up with so far:

Khand (being both the singular and plural)
Khandrim
Khandirrim
Khandi
Khandites
Khandish
Khandians
Khandese
Khandings
Khandlings
Khandrons
Khandic

This is pretty much going to come down to whatever sounds the best to you, so there are no wrong answers. I'm just trying to get a feel of what other people think as my own brain can't seem to make up its mind.

Respond with the one(s) you like most. If you want to explain your reasoning, you can, but that's up to you. If I get a majority vote, I'll go with that one. If not, I'll at least be able to narrow it down to the most popular and choose from them.

Thanks for the help everyone!
Current Mood:
confused confused
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Today we’ll take a look at “Shirriff” as described in "The Ring of Words: Tolkien and the Oxford English Dictionary" by Paul Gilliver, Jeremy Marshall and Edmund Weiner: Read more...Collapse )
Current Music:
birdsong!
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Here are some more words, found in in "The Ring of Words: Tolkien and the Oxford English Dictionary" by Paul Gilliver, Jeremy Marshall and Edmund Weiner: first up, by request from danachan : “lockholes“:

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The next word, “smial” appears in the entry “smial, Smeagol, and Smaug”Read more...Collapse )

Current Music:
The DH, channel surfing
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Saturday. Coffee. Oatmeal. Musing. Tolkien.

Yep. I think that's got it covered.

thinking out loud about Henneth Annun, specifically the Annun part and its possible relation to the Welsh AnnwnCollapse )

Cross-posted to fillingcorners and my LJ.
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What was Sauron's name before his corruption? I know he wasn't always 'abhored'. I've always thought 'Aulendil'. Sources call it just one of his personas, but it seems logical to think it was his real name considering pre-Dark Lord, he actually did serve Aule.
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Here are two more words, found in the same entry in "The Ring of Words: Tolkien and the Oxford English Dictionary" by Paul Gilliver, Jeremy Marshall and Edmund Weiner: “confusticate and bebother”:

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Current Music:
Ellen
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Well I am back to parcel out a little more from JRRT’s word-hoard as described in "The Ring of Words: Tolkien and the Oxford English Dictionary" by Paul Gilliver, Jeremy Marshall and Edmund Weiner.

Today, we’ll look at what they say about “mathom”

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As promised, here is the explanation for “eleventy-one” as found in "The Ring of Words: Tolkien and the Oxford English Dictionary" by Paul Gilliver, Jeremy Marshall and Edmund Weiner.
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So Bilbo was not just being “silly” or “hobbity” when he used the word. It seems that it must have been familiar to most of the Shirefolk there, and would be a logical development of such a way of counting.

Current Music:
GMA in the background
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